Surrey in Search of Windy Miller and a Cream Tea.

Posted in art, Bletchingley, England, london, moods, outwood, photo, Photography, relax, surrey, travel, walks, wildlife, windmill, writing on August 28th, 2009 by wabisabipix

A beautiful sunny day and the siren call of a relaxing walk in Surrey beckons.

More known for its towns it is in actual fact an area of stunning natural beauty and is dotted with quaint olde world villages never without with the atmospheric warm glowing lights of old style inns from times past beckoning you in to sample an ale or two ,a welcome break after walking the network of national trust walking routes that meander through the area.

Deep in the heart of Battle of Britain country it is steeped in history and it is easy while walking here to imagine the war time  sky battles that took place over here not so long ago.

I took a stroll in a small part of the area and found it a charming and rewarding place to spend a day.

I took a nikon D200 and a 17-35mm f2.8 lens, my usual for such wanderings,fast and very sharp..!

The walk started at the Outwood Mill ,Englands oldest working mill,built in 1665 it was the perfect place to climb and view the great fire of London that happened in the same year.

The oldest mill in England buit 1665 in Outwood Surrey.

The oldest mill in England built 1665 in Outwood Surrey.

A great place to view The great fire of London from.

A great place to view The great fire of London from.

The mill is over 40 ft high and weighs 25 tons but is so well designed that one man can operate it via a single wheel “tailpole” mechanism.

The walk took us off to the left of the mill heading across national trust pathways for a distance of about 7 miles.

Heading away from Outwood.

Heading away from Outwood.

We took a heading through a small woodland and past Outwood church before turning right onto the National Trust path well signposted as usual.

Outwood Church.

Outwood Church.

Heading along the NT path we came across a delightful grove with a pond.

delightful Village pond.

delightful Village pond.

 A place to relax.

A place to relax.

Heading north out of the woods and having crossed several stiles we were walking through open country with the sun burning down behind us,time for some sun lotion methinks…!

We headed past several farms with cattle and on through more ploughed fields with a small path clearly trailing into the distance.

A typical British scene,timeless!!

A typical British scene,timeless!!

Following the Path.

Following the Path.

A clear trail.

A clear trail.

Eventually after about 3 miles we came to a farm area which the trail took us through, past donkeys goats and other farm animals and old style barns.

Donkeys!

Donkeys!

Blackberries on the trail.

Blackberries on the trail.

Old Macdonalds Farm!!! a menagerie of different livestock.

Old Macdonalds Farm!!! A menagerie of different livestock.

Old style Barns.

Old style Barns.

Past the farms we cleared a railway line and headed north into an area of rolling fields with sheep and cottages dotted here and there.

open country.

open country.

BAAAA!

BAAAA!

Gradually the area became steeper as we approached a nearby village .

Heading up hill.

Heading up hill.

Clambering up hill after a long steady walk we reached the top of  a narrow lane passing an olde world cottage and fell upon the quaint village of Bletchingley.

Displayed on a newspaper board outside the local shop was  a Mirror Battle of Britain Special.It seemed almost as if we had been transported back in time for a moment.

Bletchingley Time Warp!!! Battle of Britain Special on Display.

Bletchingley Time Warp!!! Battle of Britain Special on Display.

The lovely village of Bletchingley.

Parched and thirsty from the walk and seduced by the signs offering cream teas we set down in a wonderful tea room called Lamingtons right in the center of the village.

Lamingtons Tea room.

Lamingtons Tea room.

The Perfect Place for a break.

The Perfect Place for a break.

Cream tea.

Cream tea.

Refueled and refreshed but dreaming of more scones and cream we head away from the tea rooms and wander through the sunkissed village past the Prince Albert pub and rejoin our route heading south back towards Outwood but following a parallel route avoiding the roads.

The Prince Albert Pub.

The Prince Albert Pub.

With the sun getting lower the landscape developed  a warmer glow and the route took us through corn fields and woodlands as we descended back down the hill towards our stating point about 3.5 miles away.

Sunkissed cornfields.

Sunkissed cornfields.

South bound.

South bound.

Soon the area is aglow by sunlight as we cross the final stage heading back to our start point the windmill.Turning a corner we stumble across a field of glowing Sunflowers.

Sunflowers.

Sunflowers.

We pass through more yellow glowing fields before finally picking up the path heading back through nearby woods and a few more stiles marked with NT markers

Dusk lit fields.

Dusk lit fields.

Breaking through the woodland shade we the find ourselves opposite the mill as the sun catches it just right.

Dusk light.

Dusk light.

perfect!

perfect!

We arrive back as the windmill is bathed in light and head off to the Bell Inn nearby with its 300 year old ships bell for a well earned pint of cider.

I really can’t think of a better way to spend a sunny sunday afternoon than a good walk in an area such as this.

Bon Voyage.

Pictures copyright: Kerry Davies

www.wabisabipix.com

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Windsor Great Park

Posted in England, moods, photo, Photography, relax, travel, Uncategorized, walks, wildlife, Windsor Great Park, writing on August 20th, 2009 by wabisabipix

A visit to Windsor Great Park near London  proved a photo feast for wildlife pictures using a 300mm f2.8 nikkor i snapped a feisty Heron and a Cormorant going about their daily errands at the Cows pond area of the park.

 

 

 

All the best.

Pictures copyright : www.Wabisabipix.com

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Stonehenge a Journey back in time.

Posted in art, crop circles, England, leylines, london, moods, photo, Photography, relax, stonehenge, travel, ufo, Uncategorized, Wales, walks, wildlife, writing on August 17th, 2009 by wabisabipix

Stonehenge one of the greatest and most mysterious of  mankinds ancient monuments lies at the heart of the Salisbury Plain a chalk plateau that is 300 square miles in area and at the heart of Wiltshire.

Stonehenge place of mystery and legend

Stonehenge place of mystery and legend

Much of the area is today used by the military as it is one of the largest  grassland plains in northwest Europe and ideal for driving tanks and buzzing around in aircraft.

It is also steeped in legends and one of the most famous locations  in the world for ancient archaeology.There are hundreds of ancient burial mounds known as Barrows, the family tombs of ancient tribal Chieftains and members of the tribal heirarchy dotted around.

The whole area with its wide panoramic sky line  leaves you overwhelmed by the sense of a place of awesome mystery and perhaps( if you believe in it) ancient power.It lies at the center of  what some believe is an ancient ley line vortex and its no surprise that its a UFO hotspot and crop circle center.

Even driving through the area with the wind blowing through open windows as the sun descends over a glowing landscape  is exhilarating and yet oddly calming at the same time.

Strangely meteors are quite often attracted to the area and many of the locals apparently have considerable collections . It is a great place to watch the skies for a bit of astronomy but take a steel helmet of course!!!

And for any birdwatchers there are apparently Great Bustards in the area after they were released in the area in 2003 .

I recently visited the area on a fantastic walking trip on a magnificent sunny day and followed a route from the town of Amesbury famous as the last haunt of Queen Guinevere from the legends of king Arthur.The route is known as walking route ID 4755 and i will give a brief guide to the walk with some pictures.

St Mary and St Melor Parish Church

St Mary and St Melor Parish Church

The Walk starts in a car park at the rear of St Mary and St Melor Parish Church where you can stock up on supplies at the nearby shops.I would pick up a map enroute so you can visualise the ancient pathways.

I took  a Nikon D200 with a 17-35mm f2.8 set at 100 iso a light weight kit as it was a stunning sunny day and stashed a  few bottles of water to compliment  a hearty English Breakfast. The walk takes about 3-4 hours and covers about 7 miles so bear that in mind.

On leaving the church car Park turn right and head passed the church and over the bridge with its River Avon sign.

River Avon Bridge Amesbury

River Avon Bridge Amesbury

Before we  go further it is necessary to pull aside the veil of modern history and peer back into time  to get a feel for the Mythic and Legendary place that Ancient Britain once was.

There are many theories about how the Blue stones were brought here,some suspect an ancient glacial freeze over which allowed ancient people to sled them across the Bristol Channel from Wales and up the river paths to their Salisbury resting place,others suggest that the Stones that form part of Stonehenge were originally transferred by an ancient people  by boat  or barge across the Bristol Channel from Presceli West Wales,then along the Avon and Frome rivers,back on land near frome then overland to Warminster then into the river wylye to Salisbury and finally back up the river Avon to Amesbury. It is thought  that the river bank on your left hand side was the location where they were brought onto land and moved into their current location,others were thought to have come from the Avebury area.In fact a recent sensational discovery seems to confirm a link with this river bank , another Bluestone henge site has been discovered and is being excavated by Sheffield University fueling speculation that the second one may have acted as a kind of reception site for the dead,a kind of last stop in a ritual multi stage river journey with stop off points with a few mythic hillside chalk murals to break up the Journey and take a break from all the rowing up or down river!!! Ceremonial funeral longboats may have brought the Royal or legendary dead on their way to the after life. Maybe there was a brief stop off for ritual preparation at the water surrounded Glastonbury Tor known as the ancient mythic celtic gateway to the underworld and also a place of  healing. The flotilla would then head up or down the river ,depending on its starting point, to Stonehenge or Avebury via the ancient white horse engraved lands of Wiltshire or Devon. These Monumental hillside images may Perhaps have been a graphic ancient reminder of  the celtic legend of the wild hunt of Gwynn Ap Nudd the gatherer of souls,a shape changing character also linked to the god Nodens and the Inspiration for Hern in England, who tales tell commanded fairy folk that legends assert reside in Glastonbury Tor. According to myths that reach as far as ancient Europe it is said Gwynn Ap Nudd and his many international Incarnations that thundered through the  landscape and the Stormy night sky along with a retinue and hunting party of legendary white horses and hell hounds with red tipped ears ,on a fearsome hunt to gather the souls of the dead for a journey into the Abyss of the Underworld. The Naked club wielding Cerne Abbas man in Dorset near the River Cerne seems originally to have been an actual portrayal that of Nudd or Herne the hunter,Mythic characters well known to pre Christian and pre Roman people that would have been the subject of many a scary fireside Childrens tale,an interpretation now largely forgotten in the dusty corridors of  ancient history.Cerne Abbas in its current  form is dated to the 17th century but was thought to have replaced a more ancient version in the same spot that has been slightly modified and reinterpreted by Celts and Romans alike.

These Ancient lands have interesting names that are suggestive of their ancient pagan or celtic past.

Avebury and Avalon  for example share “Ave” or possibly “Ava”  thought originally to be an ancient word for river or in ancient Welsh a word for apple.Interpretation in this context knowing this connection may more correctly suggest a land of the blessed.Perhaps it may have been locals asserting  Somersets reputation for rather good cider!!  The reference to Ava turns up a lot in this area in town names etc along with the word Bury for example Avebury,Amesbury etc .Maybe over the centuries Avalon became linked to Avon,a suggestion perhaps to the Avon river as a route to the land or Isle of the blessed.

Interestingly Scholars and local Monks frequently like to link  Arthurian myths of Avalon to Glastonbury thought to have been a water bound inland island at the time and said to be the true resting place of King Arthur.

In early Christian times Glastonbury was known as a  place of monks and later an Abbey and once the  home of a hermit.The Monks of Glastonbury were quite active during the centuries both here and across the country trying to stamp out ancient beliefs by creating their own brand of Myths which they variously attached to local  places that already had their own Legends quite often using the essence of the local tradition and smoothing it over after incorporating it into the christian tradition.

A kind of rewriting or updating of history and the reincorporation of ancient ideas took place during the struggle between pro and anti Christian  Roman Emperors who took rule with the intention of filtering out ancient beliefs and blending the pagan history with their own version along with the renaming of local Deities.

After many conquests and emperors the saying “History is written by the victors” invariably held true but if you look closely,every now and then, the veil of what became the accepted belief blows to one side and once again and you see its true historic source.

The reasons and motivations for dreaming up and applying such legends at places such as Glastonbury with its King Arthur burial legends and also Looe Island,another of the Monks of Glastonburys ventures,involving a legend of a visit by Christ and Joseph of Arimathea and the renaming of the island as St Georges Island,we can only speculate at but I suspect it was quite a lucrative industry at the time.

Back to the subject of Stonehenge ,It does seem that many stones form the second Blue Henge site recently discovered  probably were moved  over the centuries and became part of the frequently rebuilt Stonehenge site we see today.

Interestingly and of note ,both of the sites at the Stonehenge including the new Bluestone Henge seem to have revealed the existence of stashes of  Red Deer Antlers.Archaeologists suggest their use as tools during construction but could it have been that ancient Shamans wore Antlers during rites of Pagan commune with the spirits of nature they believed in,  perhaps with echoes of the wild hunt of legend and Nudd or Herne the Hunter often portrayed with antlers,in fact it is probably more than a little coincidental that in its attempt to subvert the indigenous pagans to the newly arrived  christian religion that accompanied the  reign of  Roman Emperor Constantine in 312 AD ,the Pan like character known as the Devil with his very own set of pagan like  horns or antlers became the villain.

Everything Changed again with the reign of  pro pagan Emperor Julian who tried to abolish Christianity in 359AD and then arrived Emperor Arbogastes 391AD who reinstated it,confusing times!!!

With regard to the Arthurian legends and most notably those of another local monk Geoffrey of Monmouth, the construction of Stonehenge is attributed to Merlin and Aurelius king of Britain in the 5th century with help from  King Arthurs father Uther Pendragon and 15000 knights who captured the Stones from Ireland(originally however thought to be from Africa), where locally it became known as “the giants Dance” and with Merlins “technical” wizardry,spirited them over and set them up as a monument to those killed in battles with the Saxons and also because of their alledged healing powers.

One thing various academics seem to believe however is that some but not all stones were erected at a later date and are not from the local area so  it seems the Stonehenge project  has been an ongoing work in progress through the centuries.

In May 2002 a body that became known as the Amesbury Archer  was found 3 miles from Stonehenge.The body was found with gold arm bracelets and various  arrowheads ,some inside the body suggesting a violent death and pottery offerings.It was one of the greatest finds in the area and has been the source of many theories.

Alongside the body was another skeleton believed to be the mans son.

One of  the objects ,a boars tusk also seems to reflect back on the ancient Pagan beliefs where Boars tusks were regarded as sacred objects.

There are many suggestions about his past but is it possible this man was perhaps a Shaman or Chief priest in the Stonehenge  and  met his death during a non democratic regime change and persecution of the old ways?

Carbon dating suggests a date at about 2500BC but this isnt always very accurate.

Speculatively could this possible Shaman character and his son have been slain by a new incoming belief, the persecution of the Druids Perhaps? who knows? What we do know,even in current times, is that history shows that regime change is rarely non violent.

Back to the walk.

Once passed the bridge follow the road up hill until you meet a dual carriageway (the A303)keeping on the pavement all the way until you see a large cottage on your right at which point you cross the road and enter a National Trust area  through a gate and enter the Kings Barrow area.

The Kings Barrow Area Gate

The Kings Barrow Area Gate

The Kings Barrow Area is the Location of some of the largest Barrow burial mounds in the area surrounded by gnarly(quite spooky) white trees, these are the final resting place of very important people  dating back to 3000-4000Bc . The area at the end of a large processional area  3km long known as the Cursus that subject to what you believe may have been used as a final route to bury the dead after preparation at the Stonehenge monument.

Kings Barrow Burial Mounds

Kings Barrow Burial Mounds

Following the path further on  passing alongside a wooded area you pass fields filled with sheep and can enjoy the view of the Stonehenge in the distance.Another view of the Kings Barrows

Following the Kings Barrow Ridge Pathway you eventually come to a sign that is marked Cursus and Larkhill,take the cursus Direction.

The Cursus Signpost

The Cursus Signpost

After a pleasant walk you pass through fields staying on the path and heading  for a national trust Stile that will take you into an area known as the Cursus.

Sheep sheltering from the midday sun at Kings Barrow ridge.

Sheep sheltering from the midday sun at Kings Barrow ridge.

Views on the Kings Barrow ridge

Views on the Kings Barrow ridge

Cornfields off  the Kings Barrow Ridge

Cornfields off the Kings Barrow Ridge

The Start of the Cursus.

The area of the Cursus is thought to have been a bit like a 3km long race track several feet high and made of chalk.It was there when the Romans were here but now continual ploughing has not left any trace of it.

Its true purpose like everything in this mysterious place is hard to fathom as we peer back  in the mists of time however it appears to have been important in some way from the Neolithic to the Bronze age.

Was it perhaps the area in which the stones were stored and prepared for the grand design of Stonehenge,a kind of ancient building site storage area and camp in which stoneworkers chipped away and shaped their handywork before finally hauling it with help from oxen over to the planned location on the nearby flat slope?

This seems Likely!

Did it later on become a funeral procession route to the area near the Kings Barrows nearby?

Its even suggested it was a kind of race course,perhaps for chariots,this I suspect not.

With its close proximity to the Henge I Suspect It probably did get used as a gathering point at a later date though and may have provided a camp for the funeral processions.

Our course now leads across the cursus and onwards towards another series of national trust stiles and we can but wonder at what this place may have looked like thousands of years ago and the events that took place here.

Across the cursus

Across the cursus

The Center view of the Cursus

The Center view of the Cursus

Walking across the Cursus you Eventually reach a path that veers to the left and heads in the direction of the Stonehenge itself .We now follow this while viewing more barrows off to the right.

Burial mounds off to the right of Stonehenge

Burial mounds off to the right of Stonehenge

After a short distance we approach the rear of the car park to the Stonehenge monument itself no doubt swarming with tourists.

There are plenty of facilities here and its a good place for a break and to refuel yourself.

While there I met a local chap and his partner who makes a living as a Druid campaigning for better access for people to the stones.In recent years the public haven’t been able to walk among them and he thinks this should change.

Recently he has been protesting that scientists should return the ancestors back to their home after several were taken as samples for research.

His name no less King Arthur Pendragon.

King Arthur Pendragon.

King Arthur Pendragon.

And Queen Guinevere i Presume!

And Queen Guinevere i Presume!

Clock?Temple?mortuary?Round table? i suspect all at one point or other!

Clock?Temple?mortuary?Round table? i suspect all at one point or other!

Stonehenge We can but wonder!

Stonehenge We can but wonder!

Turning a 17-35mm f2.8 and underexposing a little gave this deep blue effect.

Civilisation!!!

Civilisation!!!

Tourists fighting for space!

Tourists fighting for space!

The Stones are an amazing sight to behold  I do wonder however that in this digital camera age are people starting to view picture taking as a disposable activity and losing a few manners along the way.In the old days courtesy was observed when someone was holding a camera with 36 frames of film to work with but now its a free for all ah! its called progress,Civilization!!!?

Interestingly I found it hard finding camera film enroute to the area (I often use film and digital) however the gift shop at Stonehenge does stock it.

Heading away from the stonehenge the agricultural landscape.

Heading away from the stonehenge the agricultural landscape.

After refreshments (ice cream and a delicious strawberry slush drink served at a kiosk) we start heading away from the throng and soon we find ourselves back on the country path outside the gates next to the toilets  at Stonehenge.

Following the path through agricultural fields the light is starting to get that gorgeous late afternoon hue.

At a sign for Amesbury we turn left walking parallel to the A303 before heading back in across some fields at the next boundary point down.

It takes us across a green track passing some odd hay formations almost Henge like themselves.

Straw Henge!

Straw Henge!

The Path heading back towards Amesbury,Stonehenge behind us.

The Path heading back towards Amesbury,Stonehenge behind us.

Barrows backlit by the sun.

Barrows backlit by the sun.

Heading past more Barrows spectacularly back lit by the low sun we head left bearing left on a national trust Marker and walk along a fenceline that follows a plantation until entering some recently ploughed fields (one eye of course on the ground looking for buried treasure!) with spectacular gradations well lit by the sun.

Poppies along the path to Amesbury.

Poppies along the path to Amesbury.

The Sunkissed landscape.

The Sunkissed landscape.

The Nikon 17-35mm f2.8 lens is outstanding when it comes down to bright detailed landscapes.

Bright red berries glistening in the sun.

Bright red berries glistening in the sun.

As we followed the hedge line the landscape seemed to come alive  as the sun raked across the area ,quite spectacular!

Salisbury summer Ecstasy.

Salisbury summer Ecstasy.

Summer fruits.

Summer fruits.

Stunning solar contours.

Stunning solar contours.

We follow the hedge line along the National Trust route and descent a hill beside cottages and a farm overlooking the town of Amesbury as we amble by and rejoin our original route back into the town passing harvester machines at work filling the air with dust our legs aching from the well spent day.

A sight from times past ,Amesbury cottages.

A sight from times past ,Amesbury cottages.

Summer harvesters.

Summer harvesters.

Swans at the bridge.

Swans at the bridge.

Descending the hill before climbing back into town we pass the Avon bridge again to be greeted by two Swans before heading off in search of a great British Sunday Lunch and a well needed rest.

I have recently started a website of images mostly travel related on the link below so please feel free to take a look and hopefully you will enjoy looking at them as much as I enjoyed taking them.Its part of an ongoing project that I will be adding to regularly.

All the best.

Pictures copyright:Kerry Davies WWW.WABISABIPIX.COM

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The Gower land of myths and Legends.

Posted in Gower, moods, photo, Photography, relax, walks, wildlife, writing on August 5th, 2009 by wabisabipix
A sight to send any viking marauder paddling backwards (given a bit of fog and a few beverages of course).

A sight to send any viking marauder paddling backwards (given a bit of fog and a few beverages of course).

blowing off some cobwebs and stretching the legs.
blowing off some cobwebs and stretching the legs.
The Worms head Peninsular Wales
The Worms head Peninsular Wales

 

A stormy Day at the Worms Head coastal peninsular in wales in the U.K seems to add to the atmosphere of mystery that accentuates the legends and myths that have lived here for centuries.

The Area in West Wales is steeped in Arthurian legends and ancient folklore and there are tales of hidden caves and passages throughout the area (in fact very true as there is a cave is on the highest point of the worm where ancient human remains were found).

It is in the heart of Dylan Thomas country and in the midst of spectacular bays and scenery.

 

The viking raiders called the long snake like coast the worms head probably after the Wyrm like Dragon creatures of their legends. I suspect it sent a few of them running as the monstrous peak rose out of the fog covered waves one stormy night after too much mead!!!

  

The Worms head bay priory

The Worms head bay priory

Also famous for its shipwrecks and smugglers the area is an outstanding area of natural beauty and an amazing place to visit.

It is a great place to blow off a few cobwebs and stretch the legs and take a few pictures.

I took a nikon D200 and a 70-200mm f2.8 nikkor while in the midst of a torrential rain storm.

The weather didn’t seem to bother the local Surfers though and the area seems to be teeming with them come rain or shine.

Surfers Catching errr! stormy waves.

Surfers Catching errr! stormy waves.

The relentless tidal formations  speckled with their Daring board bound occupants awaiting waves are quite a sight in themselves especially from high up on the cliffs overlooking the bay.

Sometimes a bit of precipitous weather is like gold dust to the mood of an area.

The local coast watch on the look out.

The local coast watch on the look out.

The region is very dramatic by its nature attracting climbers and Surfers alike and a local coast watch keeps a vigil on the head so help is nearby if problems arise .

The cliffs can be treacherous so keeping dogs on a lead may be a good idea unless your canine friends are equipped with a parachute!!!

Oh and take a rain coat and preferably a water resistant camera and above all enjoy what should be a LEGENDARY experience.

I think this sums it up:

Worms Head Sonnet

PATIENT, folded wings; with lifted head,Watchful, outlooking seawards, sits the Form Which, dragon-like, defies the approaching stormThat gathering in the west moves on to spread Rhos-sili’s sands with foam, or, gentlier, shed It’s burden o’er the wardship of the Worm,-The faerie land of gower where wonders swarm Of Arthur’s might, or Merlin’s magic, bred.So frown ye guardian cliffs that us surround,To keep us free within! The tempest’s shock And the assaulting billows make rebound;But not to deafen us; lest we should mock cries of anguish’d peoples whose fair lands Are ravaged by the lustful [foreign] bands.

 Herbert New 1876

 

Pictures copyright:Kerry Davies

www.wabisabipix.com

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